Posts Tagged ‘ social networking ’

Loving Religion, The Atheist Way

I wasn’t planning to jump on the bandwagon of those who have watched the viral video about loving Jesus, but hating religion (which got 15 million views in its first 10 days). Not only are lots of people watching it, they’re blogging about it, from a number of angles. I’ve cynically smirked at several emerging church bloggers, because of the conundrum the video puts them (us?) in. On the one hand, they’ve been deconstructing and sniping at the religion side of Jesus-following for the past ten+ years.  On the other hand, two things are happening – first, many emerging church folks have been at the deconstruction/reimagining thing long enough to have learned that the institutions of religion aren’t all bad all the time after all; and second, even if they agree with the sentiments of the video, the viral “success” of the video means they’re not on the hipster fringe […]



Bringing Blogging Back

I don’t spend nearly as much time on blogs as I used to. I’ve greatly trimmed the number of blogs I follow, too. I’ve noted before how Twitter and Facebook have changed my own blogging, and I know I’m not alone in this. So many of the conversations that I used to watch taking place on blog comment boards are now taking place on Facebook walls. Reading blogs through feedreaders has also changed things significantly. At least 80% of the blog reading I do is from within my feedreader . . . so I don’t usually even see the conversations taking place in the comment sections. But I’ve noticed a trend in the past couple of weeks. Call it a widespread case of a New Years Resolution meme if you like, but I’ve seen a lot of my friends – both “real” and virtual – posting to their blogs for […]



How You Can Join Me in Global Learning Adventures

Regular readers of this blog are well aware of my affiliation with George Fox Evangelical Seminary, and the new Doctor of Ministry in Global Missional Leadership, which will launch on September 1. It will feature challenging content from our lead mentor, Dr. Jason Clark, who is a passionate learner, as well as a highly skilled practitioner. When the students meet up for face to face learning intensives (about once per year), it’ll be in really great, dynamic locations – London and Nuremburg for the first round; Nairobi, Kenya for the second; and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia for the third. Guest lecturers from each of these locations will participate, which will give the students some amazing opportunities to learn from diverse theological, cultural, and experiential perspectives. The rest of the work the students do will be in online environments. I’ve had an opportunity to meet several members of our first cohort of students […]



Online vs. “Real Life” Personality

I’m guessing that some smarty-pants person out there has already thought of this, but if I was a university Psychology PhD student, I know what my research and dissertation would be about: developing an instrument that categorizes personality, such as the famous Myers-Briggs Temperament Indicator (MBTI). The MBTI is probably the most widely familiar inventory, assigning it’s alphabet jumble of individual personality profiles – “I’m an INFP,” or “I’m ENTJ.” In grad school, I did a good bit of study on these assessments, and really enjoyed seeing how they work. While the MBTI is an excellent inventory that gets better all the time, I would love to see a new thorough, nuanced, and validated personality assessment. Or maybe I’d just love to see a new version of the MBTI . . . like the wwwMBTI. I’ve been making observations recently of the way I interact with people in person versus […]



25 Random Things Meme

I usually avoid doing these things, but I did give in to peer pressure this time around.  I’ve cross-posted this from my Facebook page. 25 Random Things About Me 1. My resume includes these jobs: pastor, barista, cook, parking attendant, music journalist, and puppeteer. 2. I have been to 44 states in the U.S.  I do not remember all of them.  I have been to either Vermont or New Hampshire, but not both . . . and I can’t remember which. 3. In college, I was accused by my conservative friends of being liberal, even though we all knew it wasn’t really true.  I am now actually liberal in many ways I was only accused of being. 4. If I could choose contestants in a celebrity death match, I would put Ben Affleck in a cage with Matthew McConaughey.  I would cheer for them to both lose.  I have liked […]



Social Networking Question

So, with the start of the new year, I’ve been giving some thought to my online world of “friends.”  Specifically, I’ve been thinking about going through my “friends” on Facebook and purging some folks.  There are lots of folks that I’ve met once, became Facebook friends with, and then have never seen or heard from them again.  In most of these cases, I won’t ever see or talk to them again.  Students who have come through Seattle on a mission trip, friended me, then went back home, graduated, and are off to their careers are a good example. And then there are all the people who have sent me friend requests, even though we’ve never met, and likely never will.  They’ve seen some famous people on my friend list, and think that if I know so-and-so, they want to know me. I’m not trying to be a friend scrooge or […]