Posts Tagged ‘ Seattle ’

So Long, Seattle

A little more than eight years ago, I arrived in Seattle, looking for some new adventures. And adventures I have had – some more painful than I would have imagined, and others more fulfilling and life-giving than I could have hoped for. When I arrived in Seattle, I decided that I was going to fall in love with it, which didn’t take very long at all to accomplish. My love for Seattle is also why I am sad(ish) to say that it’s time to say goodbye. Sarah and I left Seattle in September 2011 to go to London for my PhD studies. As it turned out, that was a shorter excursion than we had originally planned (which I briefly blogged about here). We returned in the Spring of 2012. But for some reasons I didn’t fully understand at the time, I didn’t plug back in to the Seattle scene. I […]



Life update . . . live from Seoul

It’s been many months since my last blog post. In over ten years of blogging, this is definitely the longest stretch between updates. Unlike other recent quiet periods on the blog, I have also been very quiet on Twitter and Facebook. As you’ll see below, it’s not as though I’ve had a boring life this year, I just haven’t been living it in a public way. There’s no way to do a thorough life update here without being unreadably boring, so I won’t even try, but here’s a quick overview: –       After moving to London in the Fall of 2011 in order to start my PhD research at King’s College London, Sarah and I made the decision to return to the Seattle area in Spring 2012. This was much sooner than we had originally planned, but our financial game plan didn’t work out as we had hoped. Sustainable employment was […]



Why We Care About Mark Driscoll

A couple days ago, I wrote a blog post about Mark Driscoll. No big deal. In nearly ten years of blogging, I’ve written something like 1,200 posts, and a handful of them have mentioned Mark – some in a positive way, and others not so much. But this one was different. It hit a nerve with some people. Well over ten percent of the page views that I’ve gotten in the past 28 months have come in the past three days since that post went live.* I feel a bit dirty right now. Like I need a shower. I just got out of the shower, though, and I still feel dirty. I don’t regret anything I wrote – I stand by all of it. Mark Driscoll is a very gifted communicator. He’s funny, he’s culturally savvy, he has a quick mind, he takes theology very seriously. Though this may shock […]



Breaking News: Mark Driscoll Repents

In the past few weeks, I’ve seen what many many many people have seen on Facebook news feeds – way too much of Mark Driscoll. First the hype about his new book about sex, marriage, and sex (which I have not read). Then about his insults toward the maybe-godly-but-definitely-wimpy preachers of the UK for not being famous enough. Then about the church discipline process enacted upon some members who weren’t willing to repent enough to be accepted back into fellowship after voluntarily confessing sin. Just moments ago, I finally read something that I, and many others have eagerly been waiting for . . . a sincere word of repentance from Mark Driscoll, as delivered from the pulpit at Mars Hill Church. Yes, really. Read it yourself: I believe that humility is the great omission and failure in my eleven years of preaching. I believe that this is my greatest oversight […]



Saying Goodbye to Off the Map

My friend Jim Henderson has posted the news that Off the Map, a project he started with some friends a dozen years ago, is going to walk off into the sunset. OTM hosted a number of events that were gathering places for a wide range of people over the years. The conferences were a great mix of the usual emerging church celebrities, and people I had never heard of before. One thing I’ve admired about Jim since the time I met him is his ability to identify people who are good thinkers and practitioners, but who have gone unnoticed by others. He “finds” these people, and just sticks a microphone in their hands . . . sometimes without asking permission! For all the conferences and events I’ve attended over the past ten years, Off the Map was far and away my favorite place to just hang out with people. There […]



Africa Comes First

The preparations for the big move to London continue. Most of our belongings are either gone now, or will be in the next couple of days. We’re trying to nail down housing, say goodbye to friends, and tie up all the loose ends. But what I haven’t mentioned much, whether on this blog, or on other social media outlets is that when I get on an airplane in four days, it won’t be London bound. First, I’m headed to Africa. I’ll be joining up with the cohort of students I help supervise through George Fox Seminary’s Doctor of Ministry in Global Missional Leadership. I’ve blogged about this program in the past. The cohort of students I work with met up for the first time about a year ago in the UK and Germany, and this time around, we’re going to be learning together in Nairobi, Kenya and Me’kele, Ethiopia. We’ll […]



A Seattle Tribute

I sit in an apartment surrounded by boxes, along with other items that will soon be in boxes. It’s reality check time. In less than two weeks (which is six years and eight months after I arrived in the Seattle area) I will leave this city. Not forever, but for a long time. And even though I’m not necessarily leaving Seattle for good, it has left good in me. I could write in a number of different directions about the things I’ve loved and will miss about living here, but here are five: Seattle is globally aware. Many cities in the U.S. have a large mix of people groups living in them, but few are as consciously connected to issues and events around the world as Seattlites. I can have conversations about financial aid to Africa, food shortages, Burmese monks, or Bollywood stars with people at the produce market, park, […]



Daniel Blue Live at The Round

I haven’t really blogged about my community of faith here in Seattle, but as the time for me to be away from it approaches, I want to acknowledge the good folks at Church of the Apostles (COTA). I’ll write more about the church itself in another post, but one of the many beautiful things to come out of this quirky little band of God-chasers is a separate, non-religious non-profit organization called the Fremont Abbey Arts Center. Concerts, dance recitals, music lessons, and community events all take place at the Fremont Abbey. In fact, COTA, while being the “owner” of the Abbey, is only a minority user of it these days. Every month, the Abbey puts on its signature event, called The Round. A few musical artists/bands, poets, and visual artists all share the stage together, creating art that is engaging, interactive, and intimate. It’s been going for over six years […]



GPS: London

Is it really July, and I’m just now getting around to my first post of 2011? Yes and yes. I, like many other formerly regular bloggers, have tried to kick start some motivation to become more frequent and consistent in posting, but it hasn’t seemed to happen. The last time I posted, it was to talk about some big changes – primarily, my marriage to Sarah. That took place a little over six months ago, and I’m very grateful. Meeting her was unexpected, as was everything that followed. It’s been a gift and a joy to be with her. And now our life together is taking another somewhat unexpected turn . . . Ever since I finished my work on a Doctor of Ministry degree through George Fox Seminary in the Spring of 2009, I’ve been kicking around the thought of doing PhD work. As a part of my big […]



2 Days to Exegeting A City

I write this from a café in London. I arrived in this amazing city less than 24 hours ago, and am going to be getting on a train out of town in just a couple hours. Not a lot of time for all things touristy, which is fine by me, because I’m a terrible tourist (and proud of that). Good tourists, though, use an array of guidebooks that can take you on a tour of any given city according to their favorite criteria – “London on $5 a Day!” or “Top Ten Restaurant Experiences in New York” or “The Two Day Guide to Copenhagen.” I haven’t ever read those guides, but I’m sure they’re fun ways of learning a city if you on a limited time frame and/or budget. As a blue collar missiologist/theologian, I’m much more interested in the process of “reading” a city than I am in seeing […]