Posts Tagged ‘ school ’

GPS: London

Is it really July, and I’m just now getting around to my first post of 2011? Yes and yes. I, like many other formerly regular bloggers, have tried to kick start some motivation to become more frequent and consistent in posting, but it hasn’t seemed to happen. The last time I posted, it was to talk about some big changes – primarily, my marriage to Sarah. That took place a little over six months ago, and I’m very grateful. Meeting her was unexpected, as was everything that followed. It’s been a gift and a joy to be with her. And now our life together is taking another somewhat unexpected turn . . . Ever since I finished my work on a Doctor of Ministry degree through George Fox Seminary in the Spring of 2009, I’ve been kicking around the thought of doing PhD work. As a part of my big […]



How You Can Join Me in Global Learning Adventures

Regular readers of this blog are well aware of my affiliation with George Fox Evangelical Seminary, and the new Doctor of Ministry in Global Missional Leadership, which will launch on September 1. It will feature challenging content from our lead mentor, Dr. Jason Clark, who is a passionate learner, as well as a highly skilled practitioner. When the students meet up for face to face learning intensives (about once per year), it’ll be in really great, dynamic locations – London and Nuremburg for the first round; Nairobi, Kenya for the second; and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia for the third. Guest lecturers from each of these locations will participate, which will give the students some amazing opportunities to learn from diverse theological, cultural, and experiential perspectives. The rest of the work the students do will be in online environments. I’ve had an opportunity to meet several members of our first cohort of students […]



Reading: A Habit I’ve Returned To

Yesterday, I spent a few minutes updating my Books page. Over the past few weeks, I seem to have gotten my reading mojo back, after a pretty long hiatus. After a few years of reading like mad for school, I was forced to basically stop reading in order to focus on writing my doctoral dissertation, which took most of my time between August 2008 and March 2009. Once I crossed that finish line, I went almost completely dormant in the literary sense. I’m not sure if it was burnout, but I apparently felt the need for a break. I read very little in what remained of 2009. Even while flying all over the world, spending a ridiculous amount of time on airplanes, I only managed to read one book on my smart phone’s Kindle app. But as quickly as my book lust went away, it seems to have returned. This […]



The Questions of Caribbean Theology

Within just a couple of hours of being in Puerto Rico, I had the opportunity to sit with Professor Agustina Luvis in her office at the Seminario Evangelico de Puerto Rico.  Dr. Luvis teaches a broad range of courses, including Systematic Theology, courses on Pentecostalism, Feminist Theology, and Caribbean Theology.  I learned a lot in my brief time with her, and left with a lot more questions than I had gone into our meeting with – which is usually a very good sign. I asked her about some of the distinctive elements between Caribbean Theology and other Latin American theologies.  She has written an article about this in the Global Dictionary of Theology.  She told me that in Caribbean Theology, there is a stronger focus on the impacts of colonialism than in other Latin American theologies.  When she teaches her class on this topic, she helps her students methodically deconstruct […]



Updates and Changes

At some point in the past couple of weeks, I passed the seven year mark since I started this blog.  As it turns out, I’m pretty sure that this post breaks my longest streak ever for time away from the blog.  I didn’t stop intentionally.  No good, spiritual, profound reason.  Life just got a bit intense for me, and eiter I didn’t have any words or the words I did have weren’t ready to be shared. I’m writing this post from a hotel room, just outside of Portland, where I’ve spent the past couple of days.  It’s been a very good trip for me – I’ve gotten to celebrate the official part of my completion of a Doctor of Ministry program through George Fox Seminary.  I’ve spent time with the friends who I’ve worked with for the past few years, and the school faculty and staff, who have been so […]



Dissertate This! pt. 2

Here’s my second post taking a trip through the dissertation that kept me busy over the past few years.  In my previous post, I talked about the rapid spread of Christianity in the global South and East, even at the same time as there has been a noted downturn in Christian practice here in the Western world.  While asking questions about what “we” in the West can learn from our sisters and brothers in other contexts, I thought it was also important to address one of the essential realities of our time – globalization.  <PAUSE: I just got THE biggest guilty pleasure inserting that link for globalization – the link is to Wikipedia.  Citing Wikipedia as a source in academia is a major no-no, so I had to do it here for kicks> Thomas Friedman brought the topic of globalization to the masses in his book The World is Flat, […]



The Church You Didn't Know About

I’m not sure exactly how to go about this, but this post represents my first attempt at blogging about my dissertation.  I can’t say how many posts I’ll use to write about this, or how frequently I will do so.  I’ll start with some general framing words, though. When I began the process of research and writing, I was intrigued by the possible implications of some of the writings done by a Penn State University professor, Philip Jenkins.  I had recently read his book, The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity.  In it, he gives a lot of data that proves a surprising fact: there are currently more Christians in the non-Western world than there are in the West, which has always been considered as the home of Christianity.  The past few decades have witnessed an explosion in the number of Christians in Latin America, Africa, and Asia.  All […]



A milestone passed

Yesterday morning I was able to successfully defend my doctoral dissertation, and I have now officially completed the Doctor of Ministry degree through George Fox Seminary.  It’s a bittersweet kind of day for me – I’m certainly glad to have this thing done, and have the opportunity to breathe a little and bring a bit of harmony back into my schedule and life, but it also marks the close of a process that I’ve definitely enjoyed. In part because of my busy-ness with school reading and writing, the frequency of my blog posting has dropped over the past couple of years.  I’ve also not posted very heavily on the areas of my dissertation research.  Maybe it’s just that I’ve been writing so much in academic forms about the research that I haven’t been highly motivated to do more of it here.  At any rate, I am now prepared to reveal […]



Global Missional Leadership

I had the pleasure of enjoying a couple of hours at the SeaTac airport this morning with Jason Clark, who had a layover between his flights from Portland to LAX (I know, the route doesn’t make sense, but since those flights made our little meetup possible, I’m not complaining).  Jason is a pastor from London, and a point-person in the Emergent UK conversation.  He’s also a graduate of the George Fox Seminary program that I’m set to finish up (tomorrow morning!!!). We met to conspire about a brand new program that Jason is developing with George Fox – a Doctor of Ministry in Global Missional Leadership.  It is geared toward reflective theological practice within a global context.  There are a number of things that excite me about this new program.  First, it isn’t “global” in name only – in addition to the course content and readings, there are three face-to-face […]



Reading again

I’m either proud or ashamed to say that I completed reading my first book of 2009 earlier this week.  Proud, given that it’s the fist book I’ve finished in the past three or four months.  Ashamed, because at this point in the year for the past three or four or five years, I would have completed five or six books.  I guess I could be even more embarrassed to say that even the book I finished was a piece of popular fiction.  But there’s no shame in that for me. After a long slog of research and writing, which took me out of the reading-entire-books-at-a-time game, I’m looking forward to some more normal approaches to books.  I’ve just begun my reading list for the year (which you can check out here, if you care).  There only only a few there, and I’ll certainly add to the list.  Truthfully, I haven’t […]