Posts Tagged ‘ friends ’

So Long, Seattle

A little more than eight years ago, I arrived in Seattle, looking for some new adventures. And adventures I have had – some more painful than I would have imagined, and others more fulfilling and life-giving than I could have hoped for. When I arrived in Seattle, I decided that I was going to fall in love with it, which didn’t take very long at all to accomplish. My love for Seattle is also why I am sad(ish) to say that it’s time to say goodbye. Sarah and I left Seattle in September 2011 to go to London for my PhD studies. As it turned out, that was a shorter excursion than we had originally planned (which I briefly blogged about here). We returned in the Spring of 2012. But for some reasons I didn’t fully understand at the time, I didn’t plug back in to the Seattle scene. I […]



Saying Goodbye to Off the Map

My friend Jim Henderson has posted the news that Off the Map, a project he started with some friends a dozen years ago, is going to walk off into the sunset. OTM hosted a number of events that were gathering places for a wide range of people over the years. The conferences were a great mix of the usual emerging church celebrities, and people I had never heard of before. One thing I’ve admired about Jim since the time I met him is his ability to identify people who are good thinkers and practitioners, but who have gone unnoticed by others. He “finds” these people, and just sticks a microphone in their hands . . . sometimes without asking permission! For all the conferences and events I’ve attended over the past ten years, Off the Map was far and away my favorite place to just hang out with people. There […]



Bringing Blogging Back

I don’t spend nearly as much time on blogs as I used to. I’ve greatly trimmed the number of blogs I follow, too. I’ve noted before how Twitter and Facebook have changed my own blogging, and I know I’m not alone in this. So many of the conversations that I used to watch taking place on blog comment boards are now taking place on Facebook walls. Reading blogs through feedreaders has also changed things significantly. At least 80% of the blog reading I do is from within my feedreader . . . so I don’t usually even see the conversations taking place in the comment sections. But I’ve noticed a trend in the past couple of weeks. Call it a widespread case of a New Years Resolution meme if you like, but I’ve seen a lot of my friends – both “real” and virtual – posting to their blogs for […]



Daniel Blue Live at The Round

I haven’t really blogged about my community of faith here in Seattle, but as the time for me to be away from it approaches, I want to acknowledge the good folks at Church of the Apostles (COTA). I’ll write more about the church itself in another post, but one of the many beautiful things to come out of this quirky little band of God-chasers is a separate, non-religious non-profit organization called the Fremont Abbey Arts Center. Concerts, dance recitals, music lessons, and community events all take place at the Fremont Abbey. In fact, COTA, while being the “owner” of the Abbey, is only a minority user of it these days. Every month, the Abbey puts on its signature event, called The Round. A few musical artists/bands, poets, and visual artists all share the stage together, creating art that is engaging, interactive, and intimate. It’s been going for over six years […]



GPS: London

Is it really July, and I’m just now getting around to my first post of 2011? Yes and yes. I, like many other formerly regular bloggers, have tried to kick start some motivation to become more frequent and consistent in posting, but it hasn’t seemed to happen. The last time I posted, it was to talk about some big changes – primarily, my marriage to Sarah. That took place a little over six months ago, and I’m very grateful. Meeting her was unexpected, as was everything that followed. It’s been a gift and a joy to be with her. And now our life together is taking another somewhat unexpected turn . . . Ever since I finished my work on a Doctor of Ministry degree through George Fox Seminary in the Spring of 2009, I’ve been kicking around the thought of doing PhD work. As a part of my big […]



Travel Time Once Again

After nearly seven months of USAmerican domestication, I’ll be headed off the continent again soon. Here’s what’s next for me: – Greenbelt: This is a legendary music and arts festival in England that about 20,000 attend. Previous artists to play the festival? U2, Moby, and Midnight Oil to name a few. It’s similar in some ways to Christian festivals in the States, but it has a much more open constituency, is more inclusive of non-musical art forms, and is more politically engaged with issues of social justice. I’ve got a bunch of friends to hang out with there – some from Seattle, and a few that I made during my trip to the UK last fall. This festival has been on my radar since about 1986, so I’m excited for the opportunity to go. – George Fox Evangelical Seminary’s new Doctor of Ministry in Global Missional Leadership. After a long time […]



Review: The Outsider Interviews

I just finished a quick read through The Outsider Interviews, by Jim Henderson, Todd Hunter, and Craig Spinks.* It’s billed as a “DVB,” meaning that it’s a book and a DVD together. The DVD has a large number of video clips that are referenced throughout the chapters of the book. I would guess that if this were to be published a year or two from now, the iPad and Kindle versions of the book would integrate the video clips straight into the text. While I read about half of the book away from a TV or computer, I was able to read the other half while sitting next to my computer, and followed the cues to watch the clips. The content of the DVB was largely driven off of the authors’ interaction with material presented in the book unChristian, by David Kinnaman and Gabe Lyons. That book presents a lot […]



Responding to a Survey of Women’s Attitudes

One of my friends here in Seattle is a guy called Jim Henderson. I’m not just name dropping here – we really are friends . . . he even said so in his new book/DVD, which released this past week. Anyway, in what’s been a busy week for Jim, he released some data that he collected about Christian women’s attitudes toward church. As it turns out, women seem to be pretty happy with their church experiences. You can see some of the questions and results here. Jim’s asking for some broader feedback on the data, so I thought I’d put the word out to my little band of readers. Check things out, and give him your thoughts. As a white male, I’m actually not that interested in my own opinions on most of the items, but here’s my .02. First, my general response to all the happy attitudes of women […]



Malaysia Recap

Once again, apologies are in order for some quiet days on the blog.  Internet connectivity has been spotty at best since I left Malaysia.  I will try hard over the next few days to catch up. While I only spent five or six days in Kuala Lumpur, they were pretty efficient in terms of the number experiences I had and the number things I was able to see.  I must say that this efficiency was due mostly to my most excellent host, Sivin Kit, and the schedule he put together for me.  Here’s a quick run-down of my time: –       Late evening arrival on New Year’s Eve.  It was late, but not so late  that I wasn’t able to have dinner with my Sivin, get checked into my guest lodging, and see three different fireworks displays from my window at the strike of midnight. –  Walked the streets of KL […]



The Christian Allah

The day I arrived in Kuala Lumpur was a significant day for Christians there.  Not because it was the 7th day of Christmas, but because of a High Court ruling.  First, a little background.  Malaysia is officially a Muslim country.  There is a wide diversity of people groups, and along with that, an acknowledgment that there will be a variety of other faith practices, but the default is Islam. The court case, in some ways, goes back to 17th century, when a Dutch-Malay dictionary was created.  When it came to translating the word “God,” they used the word most familiar to the local people – Allah.  This word has been in fairly common use ever since – in Bible translations, as well as other books and training materials.  The specific case in question had to do with a Catholic newspaper’s use of the word Allah, which some people took issue […]