Posts Tagged ‘ blogging ’

Life update . . . live from Seoul

It’s been many months since my last blog post. In over ten years of blogging, this is definitely the longest stretch between updates. Unlike other recent quiet periods on the blog, I have also been very quiet on Twitter and Facebook. As you’ll see below, it’s not as though I’ve had a boring life this year, I just haven’t been living it in a public way. There’s no way to do a thorough life update here without being unreadably boring, so I won’t even try, but here’s a quick overview: –       After moving to London in the Fall of 2011 in order to start my PhD research at King’s College London, Sarah and I made the decision to return to the Seattle area in Spring 2012. This was much sooner than we had originally planned, but our financial game plan didn’t work out as we had hoped. Sustainable employment was […]



Why We Care About Mark Driscoll

A couple days ago, I wrote a blog post about Mark Driscoll. No big deal. In nearly ten years of blogging, I’ve written something like 1,200 posts, and a handful of them have mentioned Mark – some in a positive way, and others not so much. But this one was different. It hit a nerve with some people. Well over ten percent of the page views that I’ve gotten in the past 28 months have come in the past three days since that post went live.* I feel a bit dirty right now. Like I need a shower. I just got out of the shower, though, and I still feel dirty. I don’t regret anything I wrote – I stand by all of it. Mark Driscoll is a very gifted communicator. He’s funny, he’s culturally savvy, he has a quick mind, he takes theology very seriously. Though this may shock […]



Breaking News: Mark Driscoll Repents

In the past few weeks, I’ve seen what many many many people have seen on Facebook news feeds – way too much of Mark Driscoll. First the hype about his new book about sex, marriage, and sex (which I have not read). Then about his insults toward the maybe-godly-but-definitely-wimpy preachers of the UK for not being famous enough. Then about the church discipline process enacted upon some members who weren’t willing to repent enough to be accepted back into fellowship after voluntarily confessing sin. Just moments ago, I finally read something that I, and many others have eagerly been waiting for . . . a sincere word of repentance from Mark Driscoll, as delivered from the pulpit at Mars Hill Church. Yes, really. Read it yourself: I believe that humility is the great omission and failure in my eleven years of preaching. I believe that this is my greatest oversight […]



Saying Goodbye to Off the Map

My friend Jim Henderson has posted the news that Off the Map, a project he started with some friends a dozen years ago, is going to walk off into the sunset. OTM hosted a number of events that were gathering places for a wide range of people over the years. The conferences were a great mix of the usual emerging church celebrities, and people I had never heard of before. One thing I’ve admired about Jim since the time I met him is his ability to identify people who are good thinkers and practitioners, but who have gone unnoticed by others. He “finds” these people, and just sticks a microphone in their hands . . . sometimes without asking permission! For all the conferences and events I’ve attended over the past ten years, Off the Map was far and away my favorite place to just hang out with people. There […]



Bringing Blogging Back

I don’t spend nearly as much time on blogs as I used to. I’ve greatly trimmed the number of blogs I follow, too. I’ve noted before how Twitter and Facebook have changed my own blogging, and I know I’m not alone in this. So many of the conversations that I used to watch taking place on blog comment boards are now taking place on Facebook walls. Reading blogs through feedreaders has also changed things significantly. At least 80% of the blog reading I do is from within my feedreader . . . so I don’t usually even see the conversations taking place in the comment sections. But I’ve noticed a trend in the past couple of weeks. Call it a widespread case of a New Years Resolution meme if you like, but I’ve seen a lot of my friends – both “real” and virtual – posting to their blogs for […]



London Update (just the basics)

After having arrived in London nearly two months ago, it’s probably time for me to post an update here. Obviously, with a move to another country and a change in vocation, there’s a lot to write about – too much, in fact, so I won’t even try. But just so folks know that we are alive and well, here’s a quick run-down of life in London. It’s not a terribly exciting post, but that’s o.k. We landed at Heathrow on September 15, loaded down with a LOT of luggage. We checked in to a hotel for our first few nights, but then got to look at, and move in to our flat. We’re living in Southeast London, near an area called Canada Water. The neighborhood we’re in is incredibly diverse – I’m pretty sure we’re in the minority as native English speakers, which we actually enjoy. Just a couple of […]



A Conversation Partner in Malaysia

I started this blog – in it’s humble, stripped down, blogspot format – a few months shy of eight years ago.  At that time, the blogging pond was pretty small.  I jumped in because I was interested in engaging conversation that would end up developing into what some refer to as the emerging church.  Back then, I knew nobody in person who was wandering the crazy pathways I was, so I went to this new online community.  Frankly, there weren’t really that many people that were even blogging about issues of postmodernity, deconstruction, and approaching the gospel and the Church from a non/post-Christendom perspective.  So, the few blogs that were out there tended to link to each other quite a lot, so the blogrolls I’d see typically had the same core of names and pages on them. One of those names I used to see on blogrolls (and still do) […]



The Church You Didn't Know About

I’m not sure exactly how to go about this, but this post represents my first attempt at blogging about my dissertation.  I can’t say how many posts I’ll use to write about this, or how frequently I will do so.  I’ll start with some general framing words, though. When I began the process of research and writing, I was intrigued by the possible implications of some of the writings done by a Penn State University professor, Philip Jenkins.  I had recently read his book, The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity.  In it, he gives a lot of data that proves a surprising fact: there are currently more Christians in the non-Western world than there are in the West, which has always been considered as the home of Christianity.  The past few decades have witnessed an explosion in the number of Christians in Latin America, Africa, and Asia.  All […]



A milestone passed

Yesterday morning I was able to successfully defend my doctoral dissertation, and I have now officially completed the Doctor of Ministry degree through George Fox Seminary.  It’s a bittersweet kind of day for me – I’m certainly glad to have this thing done, and have the opportunity to breathe a little and bring a bit of harmony back into my schedule and life, but it also marks the close of a process that I’ve definitely enjoyed. In part because of my busy-ness with school reading and writing, the frequency of my blog posting has dropped over the past couple of years.  I’ve also not posted very heavily on the areas of my dissertation research.  Maybe it’s just that I’ve been writing so much in academic forms about the research that I haven’t been highly motivated to do more of it here.  At any rate, I am now prepared to reveal […]



Post-emerging

I’m here in San Diego, enjoying family and friends.  Last night, over at the Hawthorn House, I had good conversations around the fire out back with fellow travelers.  I won’t take the time to name drop in this post, but we laughed a lot.  As the night wound down, and only a few of us still there, we talked briefly about the whole emerging church thing.  We’ve all walked that road for several years now.  The funny thing, though, was that rather than comparing notes on which emerging church bloggers we follow and who we’re connecting with on the web (which is what we used to do early on), and which conferences we’re going to, we compared notes on how long it’s been since we’ve visited certain emerging church websites that we used to congregate around.  Months, years.  Seems like we’re post-emerging now.  I think that’s a very good sign.